Asheville Law Office Location

Personal Injury Lawyers in Asheville, North Carolina

Raleigh, North Carolina

300 Ridgefield Court Suite 309
Asheville, NC 28806

Phone: 828-552-8215
Toll Free: 1-866-900-7078

This office serves residents of:

Asheville — Home to about 92,000* residents, Asheville is the largest city in western North Carolina. About a 2-hour drive from Charlotte, NC on I-40 West, Asheville is nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains and is a popular mountain escape for people within, and outside of, the state. The Blue Ridge Parkway runs through western North Carolina and ends near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Cherokee Indian Reservation. Known for its rich historical, architectural, and arts scene, Asheville has drawn millions of tourists throughout the years. One of the biggest draws to Asheville is the Biltmore Village. In the late 1880s, George W. Vanderbilt, son of railroad and steamboat industrialist Cornelius Vanderbilt, moved to Asheville. George bought 120,000 acres of land and built the renowned Biltmore Estate, which has been recognized as America’s largest private residence, and now attracts more than 1 million visitors each year. Besides the Biltmore Estate, downtown Asheville offers a variety of culinary, music, arts, and shopping spaces. 45 minutes west of Asheville lies the Cherokee Indian Reservation, and is open to tourists. The Asheville Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of five counties: Buncombe, Haywood, Henderson, Madison, and Transylvania. Asheville is the principal city and county seat of Buncombe County.

Black Mountain — About 13 miles east of Asheville on I-40 E, Black Mountain has a population of about 8,000*, and is situated in Buncombe County. Mount Mitchell State Park and the Pisgah National Forest protect the Black Mountains, and the Swannanoa River flows through the town. One of the most renowned and well-known arts colleges in the U.S. (in its own time), Black Mountain College, was established in the town. Black Mountain College opened in 1933 and shut down in 1957 due to financial hardships, but it remains one of the most impactful arts colleges in the nation today. That impact can still be seen in the town, where there are plenty of artists’ shops and studios. Montreat College, a Christian liberal arts college, can be found in the nearby town of Montreat. Several other retreat venues can be found in nearby towns, including Ridgecrest, Christmount, The Cove, the Montreat Conference Center, and Blue Ridge Assembly.

Brevard — The seat of Transylvania County, Brevard is home to about 8,000* people. Known for the native white squirrels commonly seen in this area, Brevard celebrates the White Squirrel Festival annually, along with other special events. Brevard is also home to 250 waterfalls, giving it the highest concentration of waterfalls in the U.S. and earning Transylvania County the nickname, “Land of the Waterfalls.” The French Broad River, the third oldest river in the world, runs through Brevard and Asheville, and is the longest free-flowing river in the state.

Cherokee — The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is a federally recognized tribe headquartered in Cherokee, NC, just 50 miles from Asheville. Cherokee is located in Jackson County and is situated at the entrance of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (US Route 441). You can find plenty of activities and shopping in downtown Cherokee. The Reservation is called the Qualla Boundary, and welcomes visitors throughout the year. The Museum of the Cherokee is open all year, and Harrah’s Cherokee Casino can be found in town, and is operated by the Eastern Band of Cherokee. The Oconaluftee River passes through Cherokee.

Hendersonville — The seat of Henderson County, Hendersonville is home to approximately 14,000* people. U.S. Route 25 Business passes through the center of Hendersonville. It has the second-largest downtown, second only to Asheville. Downtown Hendersonville is known for its painted bears down Main Street, along with bustling shopping and restaurants. The Sierra Nevada brewery is located in Hendersonville. Known as “apple country,” Hendersonville is also known for its many orchards and cideries located along US Highway 64 East. Flat Rock, East Flat Rock, Saluda, Mills River, and Mountain Home are a short drive away.

Marshall — The small mountain town of Marshall, nestled on the banks of the French Broad River, is home to about 900* people and is the county seat of Madison County. It is rich with history and is known for being the site of several Civil War events. Downtown Marshall has several shops, restaurants, and art galleries. The nearby towns of Hot Springs and Mars Hill are also located in Madison County. Mars Hill University is a 15 minute drive on NC-213 E from Marshall. Hot Springs, known for its hot mineral springs and various resorts and spas, is about a 25 minute drive on US 25/US 70 W from Marshall.

Waynesville — The county seat of Haywood County, Waynesville is the largest town in Western North Carolina, with about 10,000* residents. About a 30 minute drive from Asheville on I-40 West to exit 27 onto Hwy 74, its downtown is busy with visitors exploring the restaurants, breweries, art galleries, and various shops. Nearby towns are Canton, Clyde, Lake Junaluska, Maggie Valley, all also a short drive away and known for its small-town feel and outdoor recreation areas. The famous Cold Mountain featured in the Civil War-era bestseller novel by Charles Frazier and later made into a movie, is found in Haywood County.

*Data from U.S. Census Bureau, last updated Feb. 14, 2019