Effects of a Car Crash on the Human Body

One minute, you’re driving along the highway on your daily commute to work. The next, you’re laying roadside after being tossed from your vehicle in a high-impact collision. Your body lies motionless. Or does it?

A lot can happen to your body in a short period of time during a car crash. Much of it you may not even be aware of. Many assume that the effects of a car crash on the human body are only those you can see externally, but in reality there’s an internal crash of your body’s organs that can be just as debilitating.

Let’s break down the anatomy of a car crash…

Step 1: Metal Hits MetalFirst metal hits metal when two cars are involved in a crash.

Depending on the vehicles involved and the nature of the collision, this can come in many different forms. The severity of damages to the car will ultimately depend on the speed and size of the involved vehicles.

Cars are built to take on collisions and to try to protect drivers and passengers as much as possible. The nose of the car is often referred to as the “crumple zone” and is designed to absorb some of the shock and energy from a crash. However, there is only so much your vehicle can shield you from…

Step 2: Body Hits MetalSecond metal hits the body of the passengers during a car crash.

After the car has taken all it can, the body will start to feel the effects of the crash. This stage is the one that you will feel directly. The kinetic energy unabsorbed by your car’s exterior will now transfer to your body and force it into motion.

The motion could be restrained by a seatbelt or airbag, or the force could cause your body to collide with other parts of the car – often the window or steering wheel. In serious incidents, the body could be entirely ejected from the vehicle, leading to the next stage of the collision. However, even if the movement is controlled by safety features, further injuries are still possible.

Step 3: Internal Organs Keep MovingOrgans can continue to shift and move after impact in a car accident.

The third step in the anatomy of a car crash is the calm after the storm. When your body has finally come to rest after a crash, you may think you are lying very still. But you are not.

Your internal organs continue to bump into each other even after you have stopped moving.

We’ve all learned Newton’s law that “an object at motion tends to stay in motion.” This law is especially applicable to human bodies when suddenly jolted into high motion situations. Despite the fact that there is only so far your physical body can be tossed, the internal organs will continue to move toward the point of impact until all energy is absorbed.

During a car wreck, the human body naturally goes into an instinctive survival mode. Both adrenaline and endorphins are released as a reaction to the shock. Endorphins are neurotransmitters that act as natural pain relievers when released. That’s why you may not feel the internal pain immediately.

In other words, the effects of a car crash on the human body can include your body convincing you that you’re OK.

Even if a body appears to have escaped a car crash uninjured, there’s a strong possibility that internal organs could be torn, bruised, or bleeding.

How to Stay Safe

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has found that seat belts save about 15,000 lives each year. Frontal air bags save almost 2,000 more each year on average.

While car crashes can be unpredictable and unavoidable, it is important to take the necessary precautions to limit the injuries, both internal and external, caused by a car wreck. Buckle up and familiarize yourself with the proper use of an airbag to try to lessen the severity of any potential injuries.

Finally, be alert while on the roads.

North Carolina Personal Injury Attorneys Evaluate Your Case for FREE

If you have been in an auto accident, don’t wreck twice. The car accident attorneys at the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin can fight for you and try to get you the maximum compensation you potentially deserve. Call us at 1-866-900-7078 or contact us online.

P.S. Here are a few good reasons why to choose our car accident attorneys

About the Author

LaDonna Williams practices personal injury law in North Carolina for the Law Offices of James Scott Farrin. In 2014, she served as the Auto Torts Membership Co-Chair for the North Carolina Advocates for Justice. LaDonna’s professional affiliations include the North Carolina Bar Association, the Durham County Bar Association, the 16th Judicial District Bar, U.S. District Court: Eastern and Middle Districts of NC, and the Cambridge “Who’s Who” Executive and Professional Registry for 2010. LaDonna’s legal accomplishments earned her recognition on the 2010 “Rising Stars” list from Super Lawyers. For “Rising Stars” standards of inclusion, visit superlawyers.com.